Visceral Motility and Visceral Chains

A Pre-Convocation course

Merchandise Details: Visceral2018-03

Hilton Anatole in Dallas

Kenneth J. Lossing, DO, course director

22 credits of NMM-specific AOA Category 1-A CME anticipated

Save 10% on this course registration when you also register for the 2018 Convocation.

Download the course flier.


 
Member Price: $1,320.00
Non-Member Price: $1,320.00

 
Maximum Capacity: 40
Maximum CME Credits: 22

 
When: 3/18/2018 @ 08:30 AM to 3/20/2018 @ 04:30 PM
Registration open from: 10/1/2017 to 3/20/2018

 
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Event Description

In this course, attendees will explore the inherent motions, or motility, of the viscera of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. These motions are not to be confused with the motility of the gastrointestinal tract as described in gastroenterology books, nor with mobility, which is movements caused by respiration. Visceral motility occurs at a rate of  5 to 7 cycles per minute, concurrent with a visceral motility of the brain. As the organ moves away from the midline, it is called inspir, and when returning to the midline it is called expir. This motion is three-dimentional. Its amplitude is small enough that it can’t be measured or seen radiographically, but it is palpable. In organs that are weak or strained, the motility is less. In addition to being palpable, the strength of motility can be palpated in the corresponding meridian. The motions reproduce the embryological development.

Visceral chains connect the cranium, the viscera, the upper and lower extremities and the spine. We find these chains in patterns, which allows us to be able to more precisely understand, diagnose and treat what appear to be cranial, musculoskeletal and visceral problems, in a more effective sequence. 

“Central sag phenomenon" is a recent clinical discovery that connects Sutherland’s idea of sacral sag with spinal ligaments, visceral ptosis and prolapse, with the hips, psoas, and iliacus muscles. This sag phenomenon occurs quite frequently and is connected with recurrent low back pain, SIBO, bladder problems, urinary frequency and incontinence, BPH, fatigue, and difficulty standing for prolonged periods.

Continuing Medical Education
22 credits of NMM-specific AOA Category 1-A CME anticipated.&

Course Times
Sunday and Monday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Meal Information
Breakfast and lunch are on your own. Coffee and tea will be provided.

Course Location
Hilton Anatole Dallas
2201 N. Stemmons Freeway, Dallas, TX 75207
Make hotel reservations now: physician link, student link
To make your reservations by phone, call (214) 748-1200 and provide the group code (AAO for physicians, AAS for students).

Travel Arrangements
Contact Tina Callahan of Globally Yours Travel at (800) 274-5975 or globallyyourstravel@cox.net.

Registration Fees

Category On or before
Jan. 18, 2018
Jan. 19 through
March 2, 20181
Save 10% when you register for the AAO's 2016 Convocation With Convo Without Convo With Convo Without Convo
Academy member in practice2 $828 $920 $918 $1,020
Resident or intern member $648 $720 $738 $820
Student member $378 $420 $468 $520
Nonmember practicing DO
or other health care professional
$1,098 $1,220 $1,188 $1,320
Nonmember resident or intern $918 $1,020 $1,008 $1,120

1 Registrations received after March 2 will be processed on-site, incurring a $150 late fee.  2 The AAO’s associate members, international affiliates and supporter members are entitled to register at the same fees as full members. This course is not appropriate for students.

A 1994 graduate of what is now the A.T. Still University–Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kenneth J. Lossing, DO, served an internship and combined residency in neuromusculoskeletal medicine and family practice through the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine in Athens. He is board certified in both neuromusculoskeletal medicine and family medicine.

Dr. Lossing studied visceral manipulation with Jean-Pierre Barral, DO (France). An internationally recognized lecturer, Dr. Lossing contributed to the second and third editions of the American Osteopathic Association’s Foundations of Osteopathic Medicine textbook.

As the AAO’s 2014-15 president, Dr. Lossing was featured in a segment of “American Health Front!” that focused on osteopathic manipulative medicine.

Dr. Lossing and his wife, Margret Klein, OA, run a private practice in San Rafael, California.

Hilton Anatole and Dallas skyline

Hilton Anatole Dallas
2201 N. Stemmons Freeway, Dallas, TX 75207
Make hotel reservations now: physician link, student link
To make your reservations by phone, call (214) 748-1200 and provide the group code (AAO for physicians, AAS for students).

Contact Tina Callahan of Globally Yours Travel at (800) 274-5975 or globallyyourstravel@cox.net.